Un-Ethical Leadership (Part Two)

Relational Leadership recognizes that the at core of unethical behavior is a distorted view of people and our relationship to them. For example, how do you as a leader look at your people? Are they children to be managed, resources to be exploited, pieces of the organization to be shuffled and arranged by an omnipotent “human resource … Continue reading Un-Ethical Leadership (Part Two)

Un-Ethical Leadership (Part One)

At times, church leaders behave unethically. Padding membership reports to the denomination; under (or over) reporting finances to the congregation; making decisions for parishioners as though they were children; refusing to address poor behavior from fellow leaders and congregants; these are ethical leadership issues. Christians are known for having a moral code, even if they aren't  so good … Continue reading Un-Ethical Leadership (Part One)

Relational Leadership (Part Four)

Describing Relational Leadership is what my last posts have been about. Relational Leadership, as explained in Part Two, is the recognition that leaders and followers are in relationship to one another. Good leaders must therefore connect with the values and motivations of followers. In other words, a Relational Leader understands that the culture of a group, whether a church … Continue reading Relational Leadership (Part Four)

Relational Leadership (Part One)

What is Relational Leadership? Some define it as leadership by consensus (also derisively known as "Pooled Ignorance"). Others think Relational Leadership is about creating good relationships in an organization (of course, “good for whom” is always nebulous). Still others think Relational Leadership is about playing politics, paying attention to what others want in order to … Continue reading Relational Leadership (Part One)